The Historical Text Archive: Electronic History Resources, online since 1990 Bringing you digitized history, primary and secondary sources
 
HTA Home Page | Links | United States | Colonial

This subcategory contains 86 links

  • 1775: The French and Indian War Page(95 clicks)
    Covers more than 1775
  • 17th Century Riddles(87 clicks)
    Plimouth Plantation
  • A Dramatic Revival: The First Great Awakening in Connecticut(101 clicks)
    By Sarah Valkenburgh in the Concord Review
  • A Midwife's Tale(99 clicks)
    18th Century through a woman's eyes
  • Americanization of Benjamin Franklin, The(97 clicks)
    Benjamin Franklin is one of America’s best known Founding Fathers, yet he spent fewer years of his life in the country he helped to found than Washington or Jefferson. A self-made man who made a fortune as a printer, he became a cosmopolitan anglophile, scientist, and consummate eighteenth-century gentleman. After his death in 1790, Franklin became a standard bearer for the values of hard work and temperance. Gordon Wood is Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History at Brown University and the author of The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin.
  • An Account of the new-invented Pennsylvania Fireplaces(92 clicks)
  • Archiving Early America(96 clicks)
    Our main focus is primary source material from 18th Century America-- all displayed digitally. A unique array of original newspapers, maps and writings come to life on your screen just as they appeared to our forebears more than 200 years ago.
  • Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin(83 clicks)
  • Bacon's Rebellion(98 clicks)
    "Bacon's Rebellion was probably one of the most confusing yet intriguing chapters in Jamestown's history. For many years, historians considered the Virginia Rebellion of 1676 to be the first stirring of revolutionary sentiment in America, which culminated in the American Revolution almost exactly one hundred years later. However, in the past few decades, based on findings from a more distant viewpoint, historians have come to understand Bacon's Rebellion as a power struggle between two stubborn, selfish leaders rather than a glorious fight against tyranny."
  • Bejamin Franklin, The True(94 clicks)
    1903 book by Sydney George Fisher
  • Benjamin Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette January 2, 1750(86 clicks)
    Reproduction
  • Benjamin Franklin: An Extraordinary Life(113 clicks)
  • Biennial Act of 1715(88 clicks)
    The act states forthrightly the expectations of assembly rule and the assembly's role in the colonial government.
  • Bitter Waters(121 clicks)
  • Charter to Sir Walter Raleigh : 1584(96 clicks)
    From the Avalon Project at Yale
  • Colonial American History(121 clicks)
    Prepared by a teacher
  • Colonial American History(105 clicks)
  • Colonial and Early English Hardware(88 clicks)
  • Colonial and Revolutionary America(86 clicks)
    This course covers the opening segment of the traditional American history survey. Its major themes are the character of colonial society; the origins and consequences of the American Revolution, from the Stamp Act controversy to the adoption of the Federal Constitution; the impact of the Revolution on the general population and culture; and (implicitly) the long-term significance of the social and political history of this era for our conceptions of American nationhood, society, and citizenship. Released with a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license.
  • Colonial and Revolutionary America(81 clicks)
    "This course covers the opening segment of the traditional American history survey. Its major themes are the character of colonial society; the origins and consequences of the American Revolution, from the Stamp Act controversy to the adoption of the Federal Constitution; the impact of the Revolution on the general population and culture; and (implicitly) the long-term significance of the social and political history of this era for our conceptions of American nationhood, society, and citizenship."
  • Colonial Charters, Grants and Related Documents(89 clicks)
    From the excellent Avalon Project at Yale University.
  • Colonial Currency(114 clicks)
    The Leslie Brock Center for the Study of Colonial Currency
  • Colonial North America 1492-1763(90 clicks)
    "Colonial North American society was shaped by the interaction of Europeans, Africans, and indigenous Americans. The types of indigenous societies that the three primary colonising nations, the French, English and Spanish, encountered, affected the patterns of settlement that developed in each region. This tutorial examines the development of the colonial cultures that evolved from the time of initial contact until the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763." Excellent site from the University of Calgary.
  • Colonial Pennsylvania Plantation(82 clicks)
    "PLANTATION The Colonial Pennsylvania Plantation, located on 112 acres of farmland in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, was first opened to the visiting public in 1974. The plantation is a research and educational facility dedicated to the discovery and preservation of knowledge about the ordinary citizen of the 18th century. Here visitors may observe a "working" farm and its family. Men maintain fences, care for the animals and produce crops. Women grow, prepare, and preserve food, in addition to processing textiles. Even children help with the farm work as soon as they are able."
  • Colonial Records of Pennsylvania (1853)(78 clicks)
    Vols. 1-10 have title: Minutes of the Provincial Council of Pennsylvania, from the organization to the termination of proprietary government; v. 11-16 have title: Minutes of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, from its organization to the termination of revolution.
  • Colonial Virginia Frontier(87 clicks)
    The Colonial Virginia Frontier and International Native American Diplomacy by William E. White
  • Daily Life In 17th Century Colonial Maryland(115 clicks)
  • Destroying Angel:Benjamin Rush, Yellow Fever and the Birth of Modern Medicine(94 clicks)
  • Drums and Power: Ways of Creolizing Music in Coastal South Carolina and Georgia, 1730-1790(92 clicks)
    by Richard Cullen Rath
  • Early American Newspapering(95 clicks)
    Article from Colonial Williamsburg by James Breig
  • Early America’s Jewish Settlers(79 clicks)
    by Eli Faber
  • Eighteenth-Century Resources -- History(106 clicks)
    Lots of links.
  • Experiences of the French Huguenots in America - The King's Refugees(106 clicks)
  • Fundamental Orders of Connecticut(79 clicks)
    1639
  • H-OIEAHC(86 clicks)
    H-OIEAHC is the international scholarly online discussion list on early American history and culture." H-OIEAHC is open to scholars, advanced students, teachers, and professionals who desire participation in academic discussions of early American history and culture. Academic study of early American history and culture encompasses initial Old World-New World contacts to the early nineteenth century and beyond. Subjects range from British North America and the United States to Europe, West Africa, the Caribbean, and the Spanish American borderlands."
  • History of Jamestown(85 clicks)
    Comprehensive site
  • In the Devil’s Snare:The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692(80 clicks)
  • Instructions for the Virginia Colony (1606)(123 clicks)
    From The American Revolution - an .HTML project.
  • Instructions for the Virginia Colony, 1606(82 clicks)
    Before the colony was founded
  • Jamestown Ovrerview(77 clicks)
  • Jamestown Rediscovered(100 clicks)
  • Letters From An American Farmer(97 clicks)
    By J. Hector St. John De Crevecoeur What then is the American, this new man?...He is an American, who, leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He has become an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater. Here individuals of all races are melted into a new race of man, whose labors and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world. Americans are the western pilgrims. (from "Letter III," 1782)
  • Louisburg(80 clicks)
    "BEN FRANKLIN WARNED THAT IT WOULD BE A "HARD NUT TO CRACK"--BUT IN 1745 A RAGTAG ARMY OF NEW ENGLANDERS CAPTURED FRANCE'S MOST IMPOSING NORTH AMERICAN STRONGHOLD." BY B.A. BALCOM
  • Marshall Hall(95 clicks)
    A maansion on the Potomoc
  • Mayflower Compact(95 clicks)
    Agreement Between the Settlers at New Plymouth : 1620
  • Mayflower History(113 clicks)
  • Military Artifacts of Spanish Florida, 1650-1821(98 clicks)
    An Internet museum.
  • Moravians in North Carolina; an authentic history (101 clicks)
    Author: Reichel, Levin Theodore, 1812-1878 Subject: Moravians in North Carolina Publisher: Baltimore, Genealogical Pub. Co. Year: 1857
  • Mortality Compared: The South and New England in the 17th Century(111 clicks)
    A chart
  • Mount Vernon(101 clicks)
    Educational resources.
  • Mt. Vernon, Virginia(151 clicks)
    Washington's home
  • New Netherland, Virtual tour of(93 clicks)
  • Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture(80 clicks)
    Publishes the William and Mary Quarterly.
  • Pages from the Past(85 clicks)
    Some 18th century newspapers.
  • Pilgrim Hall(93 clicks)
    Pilgrim Hall Museum is a gallery museum in the center of historic Plymouth, Massachusetts.
  • Pioneers of the Mississippi Valley(82 clicks)
    Explorations of Joliet and Marquette -- La Salle on the upper lakes and in Illinois -- La Salle's trip on the lower Mississippi -- Hennepin's voyages on the upper Mississippi -- Boone as hunter and settler in Kentucky --Robertson and the settlement of Tennessee -- Sevier and the history of East Tennessee -- George Rogers Clark -- Marietta and Cincinnati: forts and settlements -- Lincoln's early life in Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois -- The Sioux massacre in Minnesota -- De Soto's discovery of the Mississippi
  • Plimouth Plantation(98 clicks)
  • Pocahontas(135 clicks)
  • Raid on Deerfield: The Many Stories of 1704(100 clicks)
    Was this dramatic pre-dawn assault in contested lands an unprovoked, brutal attack on an innocent village of English settlers? Was it a justified military action against a stockaded settlement in a Native homeland? Or was it something else? Explore this website and hear all sides of the story—then you decide."
  • Religion in Eighteenth-Century America(129 clicks)
  • Resources on the Puritans(85 clicks)
    From the Syracuse University History Department. Includes photos as well as text.
  • Rice and Slavery(93 clicks)
  • Robert Beverly on Bacon's Rebellion(96 clicks)
    A biased comment on Bacon's Rebellion.
  • Salem Witch Trials(105 clicks)
    Documents
  • Society of Early Americanists(106 clicks)
  • The 1627 Pilgrim Village(99 clicks)
    From the official site.
  • The American Colonists' Library(91 clicks)
  • The Colonial History of Maryland(108 clicks)
  • The Colonist(82 clicks)
    Research resource on colonial history for writers, teachers, historians, students, and family researchers, with emphasis on original period works and analysis.
  • The Early America Review(79 clicks)
    A Journal of Fact and Opinion On the People, Issues and Events Of 18th Century America
  • The First Thanksgiving Proclamation-June 20, 1676(79 clicks)
    The document.
  • The Maryland Gazette. March 21 and 28, 1754(86 clicks)
    Features complete text of George Washington's Journal.
  • The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity(81 clicks)
    "ill Lepore, Professor of Early American History at Harvard University, speaks about her book, The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity, and traces the meanings attached to this brutally destructive war. Lepore examines early colonial accounts that depict King Philip’s men as savages and interpret the war as a punishment from God, discusses how the narrative of the war is retold a century later to rouse anti-British sentiment during the Revolution and finally describes how the story of King Philip is transformed yet again in the early nineteenth century to portray him as a proud ancestor and American patriot."
  • The Origins and Legacy of the Pennsylvania Quakers(77 clicks)
  • The Plymouth Colony Archive Project(97 clicks)
    "This Plymouth Colony Archive [at the University of Virginia] presents a collection of searchable texts, including court records, Colony laws, 17th century texts, research and seminar analysis of various topics, biographical profiles of selected colonists, probate inventories, wills, maps, town and fort plans, architectural and material culture studies. Also published here for the first time are a Glossary and Notes on Plymouth Colony, Seventeenth Century Timber Framing, and Vernacular House Forms in Seventeenth Century Plymouth Colony: An Analysis of Evidence from the Plymouth Colony Room-by-Room Probate Inventories 1633-85, by Patricia Scott Deetz and James Deetz."
  • The Puritans and Dissent: The Cases of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson(97 clicks)
    by Francis J. Bremer Every society constructs what one scholar has called a “perimeter fence,” which sets the boundary between actions and beliefs that are acceptable and those that are not.1 This is as true of the United States in the twentieth century as it was of New England in the seventeenth century. The debates over where to place that boundary can be very heated, pitting those who believe that a broader range of opinions can foster progress towards the society’s goals against others who fear that contested notions will poison the body politic.
  • The true Benjamin Franklin(88 clicks)
    By Sydney George Fisher. 1903 edition
  • Thomas Jefferson and Deism(99 clicks)
    by Peter S. Onuf Of all the American founders, Thomas Jefferson is most closely associated with deism, the Enlightenment faith in a rational, law-governed world created by a “supreme architect” or cosmic “clockmaker.” For many modern Americans, deist and “Christian” are antonyms, juxtaposing prideful reason—the apotheosis of man—and a humble faith in an all-powerful, triune Godhead. But the terminology is misleading and the opposition false.
  • Two Seventeenth-Century Guitars(86 clicks)
    America's Shrine to Music Museum
  • Virtual Jamestown(108 clicks)
    "The Virtual Jamestown Archive is a digital research, teaching and learning project that explores the legacies of the Jamestown settlement and 'the Virginia experiment.'"
  • Virtual Tour of Plymouth Plantation(79 clicks)
    Plimoth Plantation, the Living History Museum of 17th Century Plymouth.
  • William Hutchinson: A Treatise on Naval Architecture . . , 1794.(101 clicks)
  • Witchcraft in Salem Village(83 clicks)
    "This site introduces the infamous Salem Witch Trials of 1692, and is designed to provide accurate general information about these events, as well as information on other aspects of the history of Danvers (formerly Salem Village), Massachusetts. "
  • Yorktown: Then & Now(87 clicks)
    http://homepages.go.com/homepages/m/i/k/mikerogers/yorktown/
  • “Many Hundreds are Sterving for Want of Employment”(85 clicks)
    John Harrower Leaves London for Virginia, 1774 Migration across the Atlantic often involved a series of stages, drawing people to London before they embarked on their journey. John Harrower, a 40-year-old shopkeeper and tradesman, lived in the far north of the British Isles. Like many of the 40,000 residents of the Scottish Highlands who left after 1760, he faced poverty and little opportunity. Harrower initially planned to travel to the Netherlands but ended up in London. The great metropolis, the largest in the western world, swelled as thousands looked unsuccessfully for employment. After several weeks, Harrower signed an indenture to travel to Virginia as a schoolmaster. He sailed with 71 other male indentees, some from London, but many others from across England and Ireland. With his relatively privileged training, Harrower was fortunate and found a new life on a tidewater plantation. These excerpts from his journal tell of his time in London, journey across the Atlantic, and arrival in Virginia.
  • “Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity, The”(82 clicks)
    Jill Lepore, Professor of Early American History at Harvard University, speaks about her book, The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity, and traces the meanings attached to this brutally destructive war. Lepore examines early colonial accounts that depict King Philip’s men as savages and interpret the war as a punishment from God, discusses how the narrative of the war is retold a century later to rouse anti-British sentiment during the Revolution and finally describes how the story of King Philip is transformed yet again in the early nineteenth century to portray him as a proud ancestor and American patriot.